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Action, Interaction and Reaction from the Ritz team

You first …

Posted: January 24, 2013 - 10:15 PM ET - by Elisabeth

What does it mean to make a good first impression in a day and age when” following” and “friending” have replaced a handshake. Eye contact and appearance just don’t have the same impact on line, teleconferences notwithstanding.

As you make an increasing number of introductions online, are you considering the impact of your electronic correspondence, your social media profiles and even your phone manners?

  • When you send an email, does your subject line demonstrate your ability to the point succinctly and accurately?
  • Does your grammar and spelling indicate that you pay attention to detail or care enough about what you are sending to hit “Spelling & Grammar”?
  • Do you really need to let the person you are meeting/corresponding with know whether you’re : ) or : ( ? Some people think emoticons are fun and funny; others think they’re childish.
  • Do you take advantage of the brief bio space on social media forums like Linked In, Twitter and even facebook?
  • Do your social media platforms have a clear photo of you?
  • Are your contact details easily accessible?
  • Is your entire life on display on social media? Do you really want it to be? Are your social media posts something your boss or mother-in-law will enjoy as much as your buddies? Are you “humble bragging” or sharing?
  • Are your posts all about you? Do you interact with other people? Reply? Share? Retweet? Even with those who disagree or criticize? A little grace and consideration go a long way in making a good first – or lasting – impression.
  • If someone calls you, do they get a brief, but friendly, outgoing message? If they don’t, have you considered how your humor or rambling details might impress – or not – people who don’t know you?
  • If you get a machine, do you cut to the chase about why you’re calling and leave your contact details slowly and clearly?
  • If you reach someone live, do you stop to ask if you’ve reached him or her at a convenient time to speak before launching into your reason for calling?
  • If someone reaches you live, are you paying attention? If you can tell when other people are reading their emails, eating, etc., they can tell when you’re typing or chewing too.

  1. Thanks for this common sense/common courtesy approach to being a more respectful–and effective–communicator.

    Comment by Robert Viola — January 29, 2013 @ 1:44 pm

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